Domestic Violence Stats

Women, Men, and Intimate Partner Violence

Statistics To Know

Approximately 41% of female IPV survivors and 14% of male IPV survivors experience some form of physical injury related to their experience of relationship violence.

Data from U.S. crime reports suggest that 16% (about 1 in 6) of homicide victims are killed by an intimate partner, and nearly half of female homicide victims in the U.S. are killed by a current or former male intimate partner.

While the personal and societal consequences are devastating, there are also substantial economic costs. The lifetime economic cost associated with medical services for IPV-related injuries, lost productivity from paid work, criminal justice, and other costs, such as victim property loss or damage was $3.6 trillion (2014 U.S. dollars). The lifetime per-victim cost was $103,767 for women and $23,414 for men.

Teen Dating Violence

Physical
violence

Sexual
violence

Psychological
suggestion

Stalking

Four Types of Behavior

Dating violence can take place in person or electronically, such as repeated texting or posting sexual pictures of a partner online without consent.

Teens often think some behaviors, like teasing and name calling, are a “normal” part of a relationship – but these behaviors can become abusive and develop into serious forms of violence.

Nearly

1 in 11 Female
1 in 15 Male

high school students report having experienced physical dating violence in the last year.

About

1 in 9 Female
1 in 36 Male

high school students report having experienced sexual dating violence in
the last year.

Nearly

26% of Women
15% of Men

who were victims of contact sexual violence, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner in their lifetime first experienced these or other forms of violence by that partner before age 18.

Consequences of unhealthy teen dating are:

  • Experiencing symptoms of depression and anxiety
  • Engaging in unhealthy behaviors, such as tobacco, drug, and/or alcohol abuse.
  • Exhibiting antisocial behaviors, such as lying, theft, bullying, or hitting.
  • Suicide ideation

Ways to Prevent:

  • Teach safe  an healthy relationship skills
  • Engage  influential adults and peers
  • Disrupt  the development pathways toward partner violence.
  • Create  protective environments.
  • Strengthen  economic supports for families.
  • Support  survivors to increase safety and lesson harms.

More information on IPV and teen dating violence can be found at

https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/datasources/nisvs/summaryreports.html